Wicken Fen

A classic fen wetland site in Cambridgeshire. Owned by the National Trust. First NT acquisition was 1899 (2 acres) and over 50 conveyances later the land area is 770 ha, of which 255 ha is SSSI/SAC and 170 ha is the high quality, ancient undrained sedge fen. In 1999, the NT launched its 'Wicken Fen Vision', an ambitious project to expand the nature reserve to 3500 ha over the following 100 years. From 1999 to 2014, 420 ha of arable land has been bought and is in the process of being restored for nature.

Recording here goes back into the 19th Century, with accounts of visits by entomologists in natural history publications/journals of the time, and with many specimens from Wicken Fen in museum collections. Two books and numerous papers and articles have been written about Wicken Fen.

The species records cover a very wide range of taxonomic groups, and most of them have been put on the NBN Gateway so that everyone can access the data.

Last modified: 

Tuesday, November 11, 2014 - 20:12

Latest addition: 

Aphodius zenkeri (a dung beetle), 2014, in horse dung.

Size: 

770.00hectares

Species total: 

8674

Ranking breakdown

Breakdown of species counts by category

Algae: 

313

Slime Moulds: 

2

Protists other than Algae and Slime Moulds: 

44

Lichens: 

131

Fungi other than Lichens, including fungoid organisms: 

590

Bryophytes: 

132

Vascular Plants: 

440

Sponges: 

1

Molluscs: 

89

Annelid worms: 

28

Platyhelminth worms: 

10

Arachnids: 

304

Myriapods: 

20

Crustaceans: 

128

Springtails, proturans and 2-tailed bristletails: 

43

Insects: Odonata: 

24

Insects: orthopteroids: 

13

Insects: hemipteroids: 

377

Insects: Hymenoptera: 

773

Insects: Coleoptera: 

1 579

Insects: Diptera: 

1 922

Insects: Lepidoptera: butterflies: 

35

Insects: Lepidoptera: moths: 

1 218

Insects: remaining small orders: 

163

Fish: 

24

Reptiles: 

3

Amphibians: 

4

Birds: 

233

Mammals: 

31

Comments

9176 now...

Gibster's picture

Up to 9176 as of 22nd May 2015 (sorry, I don't know what the extra one actually was!) ref Joan Childs, Nat Trust.